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Full text of "Bulletin, Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, April, 1967"

MARY 

WASHINGTON 

COLLEGE 



ummer 

1967 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinmarywash533univ 



BULLETIN 



Iflanj titastongton College 

of the 

ttnwersittj of tftrgraia 




Catalogue Issue 

SUMMER SESSION 

1967 



The WOMAN'S COLLEGE of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Published in January, April, June and October 



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

Mary Washington College is a state-aided liberal arts college 
for women and a part of the University of Virginia. As such, it has 
an obligation to the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia to 
provide the best education for those students who give promise 
of succeeding in college. 

As a liberal arts college, Mary Washington stands firmly in 
the tradition that a broad education in the arts, the sciences, and 
the humanities, complemented by intensive study in a particular 
field of interest, is a most appropriate preparation for life and 
citizenship. 

As a college for women, Mary Washington endeavors to pro- 
vide the best intellectual background possible for the woman of 
today. It recognizes the importance of the inquiring mind, the 
significance of aesthetic sensitivity and the necessity of individual 
and corporate responsibility. 

Finally, as a part of the University of Virginia, Mary Wash- 
ington College has a unique role to fill in Virginia education, and 
is pledged to the selection of a qualified student body, to the main- 
tenance of a competent faculty and staff, and to the development 
of the academic and social environment necessary to achieve its 
goals. 



SUMMER STUDY AT MARY WASHINGTON 

The summer session offers a special opportunity for students 
to accelerate their academic progress. It makes possible the study of 
courses which students may not have been able to include in their 
schedule during the regular session. It also provides an opportu- 
nity for students to earn credits needed to improve their academic 
standing. 

Standards of work in the summer session are the same as those 
during the regular session. Classes meet twice as often as in the 
regular session, so that in eight weeks a student may complete the 
amount of work ordinarily covered in a semester of sixteen weeks. 
Students concentrate upon fewer subjects and study these subjects 
more intensively. The usual load is three classes, which meet daily. 

The summer school schedule is organized with full sixty-min- 
ute periods, so that it is possible to provide the necessary teaching 
hours in a subject without holding classes on Saturday. Classes are 
scheduled in the morning hours only. 



SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR-1967 

Dormitories Open* 9:00 a.m., Sunday, June 18 

Registration Monday, June 19 

Classes Begin Tuesday, June 20 

Examinations** Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 

August 10, 11, and 12 

*The dining halls will begin service on Sunday evening. 

**Classes are not held on Saturdays. However, the examination period includes Saturday 
morning, August 12. The dormitories close at 6:00 p.m. August 13. 



Volume LIII APRIL 1967 Number 3 



Entered as second-class matter April 1. 1924, at the Post Office at Fredericksburg, Va., 
under Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided 
for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized December 3, 1938. 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Summer Study at Mary Washingon 3 

Summer Session Calendar 3 

The Rector and Visitors 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

Faculty of the Summer Session 7 

The College 9 

Location and Environment 9 

Buildings 11 

Residential and Dining Accommodations 11 

Student Life and Organizations 12 

Recreational Opportunities 12 

Summer Program in Spain 13 

Scholarships and Other Financial Assistance 15 

Five-Day Schedule 15 

Degrees and Course Offerings 17 

Courses Offered 17 

Schedule of Classes 25 

Expenses for Summer Session 29 

Part-Time Students 29 

Classification as a Virginia Student 30 

Students Eligible for Admission to Summer Session 30 

Directions for Admission 30 

Registration 31 

Request for Application Blank 32 



George Washington Hall, 
Administration Building 



The Corporation of the University 

Legal Title: 
"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia' 

The Rector of the University 
Frank W. Rogers 

The Visitors of the University 

William M. Birdsong Suffolk 

Emma Ziegler Brown Richmond 

Richard S. Cross Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania 

Hunter Faulconer Charlottesville 

A. S. Harrison, Jr Lawrenceville 

f. Hartwell Harrison Boston 

William A. Hobbs Charlottesville 

Walkley E. Johnson Exmore 

Edwin L. Kendig, [r Richmond 

f. Sloan Kuykendall Winchester 

Lawrence Lewis, Jr Richmond 

Molly Vaughan Parrish Newport News 

Frank W. Rogers Roanoke 

Lewis M. Walker, Jr Petersburg 

J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr Richmond 

Langbourne M. Williams New York 

Weldon Cooper The Secretary of the Visitors 



(6) 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND ASSISTANTS 

Edgar Finley Shannon, Jr., A.B., A.M., D.Phil. (Oxon.) , Litt.D., 

LL.D., D.Hum President of the University of Virginia 

Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D Chancellor 

of Mary Washington College 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the College 

Reginald Wilbur Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Dean 

of the College 

Margaret Hargrove, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., L.H.D Dean of Students 

Mildred Anne Droste, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Dean of 

Students 
Katherine Frances Moran, A.B., M.A Assistant Dean of 

Students 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Bursar 

Emily Avery Holloway, B.S Assistant Bursar 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed Registrar 

Michael Houston, B.A., M.A Director of Admissions 

Carrol H. Ouenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D Librarian 

FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean and Professor of 

Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Hobart C. Carter, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Herbert Lee Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Henry Weldon Hewetson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of 

Economics 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., University of British Columbia; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of 

Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Westhampton College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Raiford E. Sumner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Political 

Science 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University. 

Reginald Wilbur Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Dean 

and Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Samuel Thomas Emory, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate 

Professor of Geography 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, Hans 
Barth, Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, and Harold Genther: Composition at the Music 
Institute under Roger Sessions and Ernest Krenek. 

Thomas Lee Johnson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Biology 

B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 



Walter Butler Kelly, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Associate 

Professor of English 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Albert R. Klein, B.A v M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Denver. 

Joel H. Bernstein, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., University of Wyoming. 

John Bruckner, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Goshen College; M.A., Wayne State University. 

Mildred Anne Droste, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Dean of 

Students and Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation 

B.S.. Longwood College; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North 
Carolina. 

Donald Ellsworth Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant 

Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Miriam Jean Greenberg, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor of 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Maryland. 

Catherine Howell Hook, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of 

Education 

B.S., Madison College; M.S., University of Virginia. 

Myra L. Irby, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College. 

Robert B. Jessen, A.B Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B. Union College. 

Robert D. Kinsman, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed Registrar and Assistant 

Professor of Education 

B.A., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Donald C. Murray, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of English 

B.A., Yale University; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Samuel H. Phillips, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant 

Professor of Economics 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Robert Miller Saunders, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor 

of History 

B.A., M.A., University of Richmond. 

Paul C. Slayton, Jr., B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor of 

Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Anne Hilgartner Bruckner, B.A., M.S Instructor in 

Psychology 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.S., University of Kentucky. 

Harold Anton Michael Kirschner Instructor in Health, 

Physical Education, and Recreation 

Graduate of Officers' Training School, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

John C. Manolis, B.A., M.A Instructor in Modern 

Foreign Languages 

B.A., Assumption University; M.A., Florida State University. 

James J. Moriarity, Jr., B.A Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Holy Cross College. 

(8) 



of the 



THE COLLEGE 

Mary Washington College is the undergraduate college for 
women of the University of Virginia. It is fully accredited by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Its grad- 
uates are eligible for membership in the American Association of 
University Women. It is also a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Colleges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Na- 
tional Commission on Accrediting, the Southern Association of 
Colleges for Women, the American Council on Education, the Asso- 
ciation of Virginia Colleges, and the University Center in Virginia. 

As a liberal arts college and a coordinate part of the University 
of Virginia, Mary Washington aims at a high level of scholarship. 
The primary emphasis is upon the liberal arts and sciences. How- 
ever, the College participates in cooperative programs with nursing 
and medical schools. It offers, as electives, courses leading to profes- 
sional certificates for either elementary or secondary school teaching. 

LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 

The College is located in Fredericksburg, Virginia, about fifty 
miles south of Washington and fifty-six miles from Richmond, 
the state capital. Both highway and rail connections with these 
two cities make the College readily accessible by automobile, bus, 
or train. The National Airport is relatively convenient. 

Fredericksburg is a city of about 15,000 situated on the Rap- 
pahannock River at the edge of Tidewater Virginia. It is notable 
for its association with colonial history and for its importance in 
the War Between the States. Washington's boyhood home is located 
just across the river. The home and the tomb of his mother, after 
whom the College was named, are located near the College. Other 
colonial shrines in the city within easy walking distance are Ken- 
more, the home of Washington's sister; the Rising Sun Tavern, 
built by Charles, the brother of George Washington; the Hugh 
Mercer Apothecary Shop; and the law office of James Monroe. 

The College itself is situated on heights overlooking the city 
of Fredericksburg, which were the object of repeated Federal at- 
tacks during the battles fought in December, 1862. Nearby are 
located the Battlefield Park Museum and the National Cemetery. 
Near the city are the battlefields of Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, 

(9) 



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and Spotsylvania Court House, now administered as National Mili- 
tary Parks. 

The campus consists of 380 acres, beautifully wooded and 
landscaped. It is an effective setting for the neo-classical buildings, 
with their white pillars and red brick. 

BUILDINGS 

Among the many buildings on campus, a few are of special 
interest to students in the Summer Session. 

E. Lee Trinkle Library contains more than 150,000 volumes, 
subscribes to more than 500 periodicals and newspapers, and has 
ample place for reading and study in the air-conditioned addition 
to the library building. All students have access to the stacks. 

The Fine Arts Center includes three connected buildings: 
duPont Hall, containing classrooms, exhibition rooms, and a little 
theatre; Pollard Hall, and Melchers, which are devoted to music 
and art, respectively. 

The Morgan Combs Science Hall provides lecture rooms, 
offices, laboratories, and other facilities for instruction in astronomy, 
biology, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics, and physics. 

Other classroom buildings are Chandler and Monroe Halls. 
George Washington Hall contains the administrative offices, in- 
cluding those of the Director of Admissions. 

Ann Carter Lee Hall, the student center, houses the indoor 
swimming pool, bowling alleys, lounges, the ball room, a tea room, 
the College Bookstore, and other facilities for student activity. 

The College Infirmary, with registered nurses and the services 
of the College physician, furnishes adequate facilities for the treat- 
ment of ordinary diseases. 

RESIDENTIAL AND DINING ACCOMMODATIONS 

The residence halls are comfortable and attractive. Each is 
in charge of a full-time head resident, who acts as both hostess and 
counsellor. Reception rooms, lounges, or recreation rooms provide 
for entertainment of guests or informal gatherings. Automatic 
washers, pressing rooms and kitchenettes add practical conveniences 
to day-by-day living. 

Dormitory rooms are provided with single beds, dressers, study 
tables, chairs, bookcases, and closets. The student should bring 
sheets, pillow cases, bedspreads, lamps, towels, soap, and miscel- 
laneous furnishings. Electric fans may be brought for use in the 
dormitories. 

Students eat in Seacobeck Hall, which contains modern kitch- 
en, storage and refrigeration space and four large dining rooms. 
The Director of Food Services supervises the preparation and serv- 
ing of meals both in Seacobeck Hall and in the "C" Shop which is 
located in Lee Hall. 



(u) 



Ann Carter Lee Hall, 
Student Center 



STUDENT LIFE AND ORGANIZATIONS 

Although summer school study proceeds at a rapid pace, rela- 
tively small classes make possible a good deal of attention to indi- 
vidual needs. Entering freshmen are given some orientation into 
college life, though they are required to take part in the general 
orientation program in September. Instructors, head residents, and 
the various deans are all ready to provide help for any student. 

During the summer session the Student Government Associa- 
tion, through elected and appointed representatives, continues its 
shared responsibility for student life and conduct. Similarly, the 
Honor System, whose administration is in the hands of students, 
is an important part of classroom and campus living. No grades or 
credits will be released unless the Honor Pledge Card is on file. 
Student counselors work with new students to interpret these re- 
sponsibilities. 

The college YWCA and the Recreation Association offer oppor- 
tunities for participation in various activities. Full-time church 
counselors, provided by their respective denominations, direct reli- 
gious centers adjacent to the campus. 

Students, except those living in their own homes and attending 
as day students, are required to reside on the campus. Every student 
must present a certificate from her family physician indicating the 
results of a recent physical examination. 

Among residential students only seniors with at least a "C" 
average and in good academic standing may operate automobiles. 
Every full-time student with a car, residential and day, must se- 
cure a campus permit immediately in the Office of the Dean of 
Students. 

General social privileges are granted in keeping with college 
policies, student government regulations, and the parental form 
returned to the Office of the Dean of Students. A married student 
must apply for special permission in advance from the Dean of 
Students to be in residence. Each case is handled individually. A 
student entering into a secret marriage is ineligible to continue in 
residence. Any change in status (marital, residential, day student) 
must be discussed in advance with the Dean of Students. 

RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Mary Washington College offers many opportunities for recrea- 
tion during the summer. An indoor and an outdoor swimming pool, 
tennis courts, and a nine-hole golf course are all operated by the 
college. Riding is available at Grey Horse Stables, not far from the 
campus, and instruction may be taken either with or without 
credit. The Department of Health, Recreation, and Physical Edu- 
cation also offers instruction in golf, swimming, and tennis. 

(12) 



Occasional dances are held Friday evenings on the terrace of 
Ann Carter Lee Hall; picnics for students and their invited guests 
are scheduled in recreational areas on the campus; and a program 
of interesting moving pictures is presented Saturday evenings. In 
addition, several public beaches within driving distance attract 
students and their escorts. 



SUMMER PROGRAM IN SPAIN 

June 22-August 8, 1967 

Mary Washington College is cooperating in the sponsorship 
of the University of Virginia Summer Institute in Salamanca, 
Spain. The courses to be offered are "Spanish Composition 
and Representative Works of Spanish Literature Since 1898" 
and "The Spanish Novel and Short Story of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury," both of which will be given in Spanish. Successful comple- 
tion of a third-year college course in Spanish or the equivalent is 
required for admission. Living arrangements have been made with 
the cooperation of the University of Salamanca. 

The program provides for weekend trips to Avila, El Escorial, 
Toledo, and other places of interest. There is also a free period of 
several days in Madrid. 

Early reservations are recommended, since only a limited num- 
ber of students can be accommodated. Further information may be 
obtained from Dr. Arnold A. Del Greco, Director of the Spanish 
Institute, 308 Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 
Virginia 22903. 



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SCHOLARSHIPS AND OTHER FINANCIAL 
ASSISTANCE 

Mary Washington College has available a limited number of 
scholarships and student aid positions in the summer session. They 
are awarded on the basis of ability and need. Loan funds are also 
available for residents of Virginia. 

The college participates in the Teachers' Scholarship Program 
sponsored by the Virginia State Department of Education. Pro- 
rated summer scholarships are authorized for students completing 
their degrees in three regular sessions and three summer sessions. 

Information regarding scholarships and student aid positions 
may be obtained from the Office of the Dean. 

The division superintendents of schools in Virginia are author- 
ized to recommend teachers for scholarship loans provided by 
the State to attend summer schools in non-sectarian degree-grant- 
ing Virginia colleges. The loans and interest can be cancelled by 
teaching in Virginia public schools. Applications must be filed 
with the State Department of Education before April 1. 

Full information regarding this type of summer school scholar- 
ship and the necessary application forms may be obtained from the 
division superintendent of schools under whom the applicant has 
taught or will teach. 



FIVE-DAY SCHEDULE 

Classes will be offered on Monday through Friday, with Satur- 
day free for recreation or field trips and tours to historical spots, 
museums, etc. 

Classes will begin at 7:30 a.m. and extend for full one-hour 
periods until 1:00 p.m. with a fifteen-minute intermission at 10:40, 
according to the following schedule: 

First Period 7:30- 8:30 

Second Period 8:35- 9:35 

Third Period 9:40-10:40 

Fourth Period 10:55-11:55 

Fifth Period 12:00- 1:00 

No classes are scheduled for the afternoons. 

(15) 



Virginia Hall, 

One of the Residence Halls 










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DEGREES AND COURSE OFFERINGS 

The College offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science in most fields of the humanities and 
sciences, as well as cooperative programs in a number of special 
fields. (For a description of the requirements for degrees, of course 
offerings, and of special programs, consult the General Catalogue.) 
Course offerings in the Summer Session are those usually needed by 
students desiring to begin or continue their education at an accel- 
erated rate, to make up deficiencies incurred during the regular 
session, or to improve their qualifications as teachers. 

COURSES OFFERED 

The following courses will be available during the 1967 Sum- 
mer Session if there is sufficient demand. The offering of any course 
is contingent upon the enrollment of enough students to justify the 
organization of a class. 

Eight to ten semester hours' credit may be earned in the sum- 
mer session. Seniors who have satisfactory records may take up to 
twelve semester hours if necessary to complete their degrees at the 
end of the summer session. 

Ordinarily each semester of a course carries a credit of three 
semester hours. If both semesters are completed, the credit is usually 
six semester hours. In the listing of courses below as "three or six 
credits," the determining factor is whether the student takes one or 
both semesters. 

ART 

Art 111-112. Art History. A survey of architecture, sculpture, 
painting, and the decorative arts, emphasizing the analysis, criti- 
cism, and comparison of these art forms in relation to the time 
and in relation to one another. Three or six credits. 

Art 452: Twentieth Century Art. The Art of Europe cover- 
ing Post-Impressionism; the major movements in painting and 
scupture (Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Abstraction, 
Surrealism, Neo-Plasticism and the various combinations) and the 
developments in architecture (I'art nouveau, the International 
Style, and contemporary) . Three credits. 

Art 481. American Art. A study of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture of the United States covering the seventeenth, eight- 
eenth, and the first half of the nineteenth centuries. Three credits. 

BIOLOGY 

Biology 121-122. General Biology. General biological princi- 
ples and their application; a survey of structure and function of 
representative plant and animal types, including man. Eight credits. 

(17) 



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CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 111-112. General Chemistry. A course designed to 
introduce the student to the fundamental principles of chemistry 
and the more important elements and their compounds. Eight 
credits. 

Chemistry 251, 252. Analytical Chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 111-112, or its equivalent. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
Mathematics 111-112. The first semester consists of an elaboration 
of the principles of chemistry with particular emphasis on chemi- 
cal equilibrium. In the accompanying qualitative analysis labora- 
tory, semi-micro techniques are employed. The second semester 
consists of the theory and techniques of volumetric quantitative 
analysis. Four credits each semester. 

Chemistry 333. Gravimetric Analysis. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 251-251. The theory and techniques of gravimetric quantitative 
analysis. Four credits. 

DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH 

Dramatic Arts 211-212. Survey of World Theatre. A survey 
of actors, theatres, and selected plays in primitive, ancient, and 
modern civilization. Three or six credits. 

Speech 231. Effective Speech. A study of the fundamentals 
of voice production and clarity of diction as an aid to effective com- 
munication. Interpretation of prose, poetry, and dramatic literature 
in terms of its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic content. Three 
credits. 



ECONOMICS 

Economics 201, 202. Principles of Economics. A study of 
facts and fundamental principles relating to the production, ex- 
change, distribution, and consumption of goods and services for 
the satisfaction of human wants, including some consideration of 
basic economic institutions and systems. Three or six credits. 

Economics 381. Personal Finance. Budgeting, borrowing, in- 
stallment buying, insurance, home owning, taxes, and estate plan- 
ning. Three credits. 

Economics 382. Investment Economics. The principles that 
should be observed in the selection of securities for investment. 
Three credits. 



(19) 



EDUCATION 

Education 313. The Teaching of Reading. A survey and ap- 
praisal of innovations in the teaching of reading with emphasis on 
the development, extension and enrichment of pupil interest in 
reading. Three credits. 

Education 314. The Elementary School. The consideration 
of the universality and intensity of the elementary school in the 
American social order and its role in social and economic change. 
Attention will be directed to (1) the problems of children and 
youth in a changing society and (2) governmental provisions for 
greater equality of educational opportunity. Three credits. 

Education 315. The Elementary School Curriculum. The 

nature, function and organization of the elementary school cur- 
riculum with emphasis on the improvement of teaching. Con- 
temporary trends in curriculum patterns, teaching of reading and 
arithmetic, methods of instruction and grouping of students will 
be included. Three credits. 

Education 321. Introduction to Secondary Education. Anal- 
ysis of the role of the secondary school in the United States. The 
avenue of approach is through a survey of the contributions of the 
foundation disciplines to theory and practice in the American 
secondary school: History of Education, Cultural Anthropology, 
Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology of Learning, Political Science 
and Economics. Three credits. 

Education 323*. The Teaching of English in the Secondary 
School. An analysis of the role of the teacher in teaching language, 
literature and composition in the secondary school: Special em- 
phasis on the learner, the selection and organization of subject 
matter content; methods, techniques and tools of the English teach- 
er; and the evaluation of learning in the English class. Three 
credits. 

Education 324*. The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the 
Secondary School. An analysis of the role of the teacher of his- 
tory, government, geography, economics, etc., in the secondary 
school: Special emphasis on the selection and organization of sub- 
ject matter content; methods, techniques and tools of the social 
science teacher; and evaluation of learning goals in the social 
science class. Three credits. 

^Either Education 323 or Education 324 may be substituted 
for Education 322. 

Education 440. Supervised Teaching. Orientation to teach- 
ing, under direction of supervisors in public elementary and sec- 

(20) 

E. Lee Trinkle Library 




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ondary schools; practical experience in classroom, laboratory, and 
field activities, as well as other aspects of the total school pro- 
gram. Six credits. 

Registration for this work must be made in advance through 
the Department of Education. Enrollment limited to students 
of Mary Washington College. 

ENGLISH 

English 111. Composition and Reading. The mechanics of 
writing and an introduction to literature. To earn credit for the 
course, the student must have a passing average in her theme pro- 
gram. Three credits. 

English 231. Short Fiction. A study of selected short fiction 
of the Western World. Three credits. 

English 232. The Novel. A study of selected novels of the 
Western World. Three credits. 

English 415. English Novel. The development of the novel in 
England. Three credits. 

English 416. American Novel. The development of the novel 
in America. Three credits. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 321. Geography of Europe. A survey of the 
European continent, including the climate, surface features, nat- 
ural resources, population, agriculture, industry, and trade of 
each European nation and the nation's position in the world to- 
day. Three credits. 

Geography 332. Latin America. A study of the landforms, 
climate, trade, resources, people and cultural groupings of the 
South American continent together with Mexico and the Carib- 
bean. Three credits. 

Geography 462. Political Geography. A study of geographic 
factors in world power and international affairs. Three credits. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

Physical Education 110. Beginning Tennis. One credit. 

Physical Education 112-113. Beginning Bowling and Arch- 
ery. One credit. 

(22) 



^Physical Education 130. Beginning Riding. One credit.** 
Physical Education 210. Intermediate Tennis. One credit. 

Physical Education 215. Intermediate Swimming. One 

credit. 

^Physical Education 230. Intermediate Riding. One cred- 
it.** 

-'Physical Education 330. Advanced Riding. One credit.** 

HISTORY 

History 101-102. American History. A survey of the history 
of the United States from the colonial period to the present. Em- 
phasis upon economic and social aspects and the evolution of 
American democracy. Three or six credits. 

History 335, 336. Diplomatic History of the United States. 
Prerequisite: History 101-102. A study of diplomatic activities and 
foreign relations from colonial times to the present. Three or six 
credits. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 112. Mathematical Analysis. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 111 or the equivalent. Topics from set theory, logic, 
mathematical foundations, college algebra, trigonometry, analytic 
geometry, and an introduction to calculus. Three credits. 

Mathematics 211-212. Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
111-112. Differential and Integral Calculus. Three or six credits. 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 

French 103-104. Intermediate French. Prerequisite: French 
101-102 or two to three units of high school French. Grammar re- 
view; varied readings; oral and written work with emphasis on 
vocabulary building. Six credits. 

French 201-202. Introduction to French Literature and 
Civilization. Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units in high 
school French. A study through selected French texts of the cultural 
and political background of France and the French people. Six 
credits. 

German 

German 153-154. Intermediate German. Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 151-152 or two to three units of high school German. Six cred- 
its. 

*Written permission of parent or guardian must be presented before enrollment in this 
course may be completed. 
**See page 29 for fees. 

(23) 

Portico of duPont Hall, 

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111 






Spanish 

Spanish 123-124. Intermediate Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 
121-122 or two or three units of high school Spanish. Conversation 
and composition; varied readings; review of grammatical principles. 
Six credits. 

Spanish 221-222. Introduction to Spanish Literature and 
Civilization. Prerequisite: Spanish 123-124 or four units of high 
school Spanish. Studies of the culture of Spain and readings from 
the works of great writers of various periods. Six credits. 

MUSIC 

Music 111-112. Survey of Music. General survey of music lit- 
erature with special attention to structural and stylistic character- 
istics and their relationships to general culture and history. Three 
or six credits. 

Individual instruction in piano is available. College credit 
up to a total of three semester hours will be allowed for this work. 
See page 29 for schedule of fees. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 201. American National Government. The 

principles of government and politics with application to the fed- 
eral constitution and national administration. Three credits. 

Political Science 202. State and Local Government. The 

government of states, counties, and other local governments. Three 
credits. 

Political Science 461. American Foreign Policy. Persistent 
problems facing the United States in its search for national secur- 
ity and international stability and progress; emphasis on our for- 
eign policy since World War II. Three credits. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 201-202. General Psychology. Fundamental 
principles of human behavior; biological antecedents; motivation; 
perception; learning; individual differences; intelligence and per- 
sonality. Three or six credits. 

Psychology 212. Adolescent Psychology. A comprehensive 
study of adolescent development— social, physical, emotional, moral, 
and intellectual. Three credits. 

Psychology 301. Social Psychology. The interrelationships 
between the individual and his social environment. Social influ- 
ences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The development 
of change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small 
groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena. Three credits. 

(25) 



Psychology 342. Psychology of Personality. A study of per- 
sonality structure, dynamics, development, and methods of re- 
search. Three credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 201. Principles of Sociology. A study of the basic 
characteristics of group life; development of society and culture; 
interaction between persons and groups. Three credits. 

Sociology 202. Social Problems. Social change; social and 
personal disorganization; mobility; delinquency, crime; industrial 
and other group conflicts. Three credits. 

Sociology 352. Criminology. Delinquency and crime; nature 
and extent; causal theories; present trends and programs of treat- 
ment. Three credits. 

SPANISH 

(See Modern Foreign Languages) 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

Summer of 1967 

Note: The college reserves the right not to offer certain courses 
listed below if fewer than eight students are enrolled. 

Catalogue Number 



and Subject 

ART 

111A Art History** 

11 IB Art History 

112 Art History 

452 Twentieth Century Art 

481 American Art 

BIOLOGY 

121 General Biology-4 cr. 



Hours 



Days- 



Room* 



7:30 


Daily 


Mel. 51 


9:40 


Daily 


Mel. 51 


8:85 


Daily 


Mel. 51 


10:55 


Daily 


Mel. 51 


12:00 


Daily 


Mel. 51 



SI 00 



122 General Biology-4 cr. 



Lecture 7:30 Daily 
Laboratory 9:40 to 
12:00 M, T, W, Th for 
first four weeks SI 04 

Lecture 7:30 Daily SI 00 

Laboratory 9:40 to 
12:00 M, T, W, Th for 
second four weeks S104 

*NOTE: M indicates Monroe Hall; C, Chandler Hall; Mel., 
Melchers Hall; duP, duPont Hall; Pol., Pollard Hall; 
S, Science Hall. 
**NOTE: All classes are three semester hours' credit except where 

indicated otherwise. 
# *NOTE: Classes meet Monday through Friday except as noted. 

(26) 



CHEMISTRY 

111 General Chemistry-4 cr. Lecture 7:30 and 

8:35 Daily S300 

Laboratory 9:40 to 
1:00 M, T, W, Th for 
first four weeks S300 

112 General Chemistry-4 cr. Lecture 7:30 and 

8:35 Daily S300 

Laboratory 9:40 to 
1:00 M, T, W, Th for 
second four weeks S300 

251 Analytical Chemistry-4 cr. To be scheduled S306 

during the first four weeks 

252 Analytical Chemistry-4 cr. To be scheduled during 

the second four weeks 
333 Gravimetric Analysis-4 cr. To be scheduled S306 

DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH 

Dramatic Arts 

211 Survey of World Theatre 10:55 Daily duP 215 

212 Survey of World Theatre 12:00 Daily duP 215 

Speech 

231 Effective Speech 8:35 Daily duP 215 

ECONOMICS 

201 Principles of Economics 10:55 Daily M6 

202 Principles of Economics 12:00 Daily M6 

381 Personal Finance 8:35 Daily M6 

382 Investment Economics 9:40 Daily M6 

EDUCATION 

313 The Teaching of Reading 7:30 Daily M14 

314 The Elementary School 8:35 Daily M14 

315 The Elementary School 

Curriculum 9:40 Daily M14 

321 Introduction to Secondary 

Education 7:30 Daily Ml 6 

323 The Teaching of English 

in the Secondary School 8:35 Daily M16 

324 The Teaching of the So- 

cial Sciences in the Sec- 
ondary School 9:40 Daily Ml 6 
440 Supervised Teaching-6 cr. To be scheduled 
(Registration in advance is necessary) 

(27) 



ENGLISH 








11 1 A Composition and Reading 


8:35 


Daily 


C22 


1 1 1 B Composition and Reading 


9:40 


Daily 


C24 


1 11C Composition and Reading 


10:55 


Daily 


C25 


HID Composition and Reading 


12:00 


Daily 


C25 


231A Short Fiction 


9:40 


Daily 


C22 


23 IB Short Fiction 


12:00 


Daily 


C22 


232 The Novel 


10:55 


Daily 


C24 


415 English Novel 


7:30 


Daily 


C24 


416 American Novel 


8:35 


Daily 


C25 


FRENCH 








See Modern Foreign Languages 






GEOGRAPHY 








321 Geography of Europe 


7:30 


Daily 


S7A 


332 Latin America 


10:55 


Daily 


S7A 


462 Political Geography 


8:35 


Daily 


S7A 



GERMAN 

See Modern Foreign Languages 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

1 10A Beginning Tennis-1 cr. 8:35 Daily Courts 

HOB Beginning Tennis-1 cr. 9:40 Daily Courts 

112-113 Beginning Bowling and 

Archery- 1 cr. 10:55 Daily Field 

130 Beginning Riding-1 cr.* To be scheduled 
2 10A Intermediate Tennis-1 cr. 8:35 Daily Courts 

210B Intermediate Tennis-1 cr. 9:40 Daily Courts 

215 Intermediate Swimming- 1 

cr. 12:00 Daily Pool 

230 Intermediate Riding-1 cr.*To be scheduled 
330 Advanced Riding-1 cr.* To be scheduled 
*See special lees, page 29. 

HISTORY 



101A American History 






12:00 


Daily 


M19 


10 IB American History 






8:35 


Daily 


M19 


101C American History 






10:55 


Daily 


M7 


102 American History 






9:40 


Daily 


M19 


335 Diplomatic History 


of 


the 








United States 






7:30 


Daily 


M7 


336 Diplomatic History 


of 


the 








United States 






8:35 


Daily 


M7 



(28) 



MATHEMATICS 

112 Mathematical Analysis 10:55 Daily S3 

211 Calculus 8:35-10:40 Daily 

for first four weeks S3 

212 Calculus 8:35-10:40 Daily 

for second four weeks S3 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 

103-104 Intermediate French-6 

cr. 8:35-10:40 Daily duP 106 

201-202 Introduction to French 

Literature and Civiliza- 

tion-6 cr. 10:55-1:00 Daily duP 106 

German 

153-154 Intermediate German 8:30-10:40 Daily duP 206 

Spanish 

123-124 Intermediate Spanish-6 
cr. 

221-222 Introduction to Span- 
ish Literature and Civi- 
lization-6 cr. 

MUSIC 

111 Survey of Music 

112 Survey of Music 
Instruction in Piano To be scheduled individually. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

201 American National Gov- 

ernment 9:40 Daily M8 

202 State and Local Govern- 



10:55-1:00 


Daily 


duP 


101 


7:30-9:35 


Daily 


duP 


101 


9:40 


Daily 


Pol. 


234 


10:55 


Daily 


Pol. 


234 



ment 
461 American Foreign Policy 


10:55 
12:00 


Daily 
Daily 


M8 
M8 


PSYCHOLOGY 








201 A General Psychology 
20 IB General Psychology 
202 General Psychology 
212 Adolescent Psychology 
301 Social Psychology 
342 Psychology of Personality 


7:30 

8:35 

9:40 

10:55 

12:00 

10:55 

(29) 


Daily 
Daily 
Daily 
Daily 
Daily 
Daily 


C16 
C16 
C15 
C15 
C15 
C15 



SOCIOLOGY 








201 Principles of Sociology 

202 Social Problems 
352 Criminology 


9:40 
8:35 
7:30 


Daily 
Daily 
Daily 


M20 
M20 
M20 



SPANISH 

See Modern Foreign Languages 

EXPENSES FOR SUMMER SESSION 





Virginia 
Students 


Non-Virginia 
Students 


Tuition 


None 
$126.25 
6.75 
71.25 

83.25 
$287.50 


S150.00 


General college fees 


126.25 


Student activity fee 


6.75 


Residential fee 


71.25 


Board 


83.25 


Total 


$437.50 





OTHER FEES 

Individual Instruction in Music — The fee for individual 
instruction in voice or piano is $50.00 for one hour's credit, and 
$80.00 for two hours' credit. The fee for individual instruction in 
organ is $60.00 for one hour's credit and $90.00 for two hours' 
credit. 

Individual Instruction in Riding — The fee for one credit 
hour of individual instruction in riding is $50.00. The fee for 
recreational riding without credit, two hours a week, is $30.00; for 
unlimited riding, for recreation or credit, $60.00; riding by the 
hour $2.50. These fees are payable directly to Grey Horse Stables, 
Inc., and written permission of parent or guardian must be pre- 
sented before enrollment is considered complete. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Minimum charge (1 to 3 hours' credit) , $60.00. For each se- 
mester hour's credit above the minimum, $18.00. A student who is 
not a legal resident of the State of Virginia will be charged a non- 
resident tuition fee of $20.00 per semester hour credit, in addition 
to the above charges. 

No student will be admitted on a part-time basis who registers 
for more than four semester hours of credit. Part-time students are 
not eligible for dormitory residence, and are not entitled to the 
benefits of student activity functions, college medical and nursing 
staff services, or dining hall services. 

(30) 



CLASSIFICATION AS A VIRGINIA STUDENT 

In order to be considered a Virginia student for any given 
semester, it is necessary that the applicant shall have been domi- 
ciled in the State of Virginia for at least one year immediately 
preceding the beginning of that semester, and the applicant or 
her parents must have been bona fide taxpayers to the State of 
Virginia for the calendar year immediately preceding the calen- 
dar year of registration. 

Residence in the State for the purpose of securing an educa- 
tion does not qualify an individual for classification as a Virginia 
student. For tuition purposes, the legal residence of a student is 
considered to be the same as that of her father. 

STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADMISSION TO 
SUMMER SESSION 

The college admits to its summer session: 

(a) High school graduates who have been accepted for fall 
admission but desire to enter college in June instead of waiting 
until September, and thus save much valuable time and expense; 

(b) The ever-increasing number of students regularly enrolled 
in college who desire to continue their studies in the summer in 
order to complete the requirements for a degree in three calendar 
years instead of four; 

(c) Those who desire to make up some required work or to 
compensate for loss of time due to illness or some other reason; 

(d) Students in good standing at other standard colleges; 

(e) Teachers who wish to renew or raise certificaes or to take 
additional work toward a degree. 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may be 
admitted as special students without satisfying the usual entrance 
requirements, provided they give evidence of serious purpose and 
show adequate preparation for the courses they wish to enter. 

Only women are eligible for admission. 

Acceptance for the summer session does not imply acceptance 
for admission to the regular session of the College. 

DIRECTIONS FOR ADMISSION 

Students who wish to enroll for the Summer Session should 
file an application with the Director of Admissions, preferably 
not later than June 1. A form for requesting an application is 
contained in this bulletin. An application fee of ten dollars is re- 
quired for enrollment in the Summer Session. This fee is credited 
toward charges for the Summer Session. It is not refundable after 
June 1, 1967. 

(31) 



Students currently in other colleges must present before action 
is taken by the Committee on Admissions a certificate of good 
standing in order to enroll for summer courses at Mary Washing- 
ton. A form for this purpose may be obtained from the Director of 
Admissions. A student not enrolled at Mary Washington College 
during the 1966-67 session will be required to furnish the Com- 
mittee on Admissions appropriate academic records when requested 
to do so by the Director of Admissions. 

REGISTRATION 

Students admitted to the Summer Session will register for 
classes on Monday morning, June 19, from nine to twelve o'clock 
in the Science Hall. Students with last names beginning with A 
through L will register between the hours of 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. 
Students with last names beginning with M through Z will regis- 
ter between the hours of 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon. 

Instruction will begin on Tuesday, June 20. The minimum 
load for a residential student is six semester hours. 



REQUEST FOR APPLICATION 

Director of Admissions 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

of the UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Please send me an application for admission to the Summer 
Session. 



Name 
Address